Dyslexic BookClub Part 3 – In time for Easter

So I guess I’m no different than other dyslexics as in I read slowly! Hence the realistic gaps between BookClub posts! But I do read loads of books at the same time – I’m also continually meeting dyslexic teenagers who haven’t found something they would like to read. This was my first main purpose in starting this blog, to help dyslexic teenagers to keep reading! It can be very difficult when you reach 15 to find a genre that appeals and especially as a dyslexic because many adult books are too dense – I know only too well the challenges of going into a book shop and finding a book amongst the vast shelves of them! Many dyslexics because of the hereditary nature of the condition don’t come from families of readers either which means there often isn’t anyone to say try this… and the books picked on many school curriculum’s don’t help either as there shear size is terrifying and language is often outdated! 

 

So this BookClub selections are:

Animal farm by George Orwell believe it or not! It is a very easy read and I have found that it really appeals to introverts, boys equally like it and many students I work with who are diagnosed with Aspergers. It is a very simple book but I guess it has some deep meaning questions that appeal to deep thinkers … It really questions how systems in society work. It can often be hard to find books that appeal to boys as well as girls and this one fits the bill. It also has the added bonus for a dyslexic reader – it’s short!

Next up in the same generation is Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote. Again surprisingly Capote is very easy to read – much easier than F. Scott Fitzgerald which is on many school courses. 

 

Capote has a much simpler style! This is a girls book but I have found for the boys, again particularly students with Aspergers they really enjoy a slightly more morbid read such as In Cold Blood.

 

Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín is a really enjoyable read – I read it very quickly and it is one of the easier reads I have had set in 1950’s Ireland and America. This is more a teenage girls book and really gives a sense of what it was like to travel to work in America as such a vast place coming from Ireland – but it also shows just how small the communities were for the people who moved. It seemed like everyone back home still had a connection to your life despite being across the Atlantic! You can take the Irish out of the country but do you take the Irish out of the person and the gossiping nature? This book should be on a school course as there are many themes and it is still an easy read!

 

To finish up this BookClub I’m going to include another book that I often recommend to the students I meet – it is a coming of age book set Swansea, Submarine by Joe Dunyhorne.

I think it is a book that can appeal to both genders and I often recommend it to boys. It has the most fantastic one liners and I found it had great humour around somevery embarrassing topics for teenagers. The film is fantastic too and the soundtrack was recorded by Alex Turner from the Arctic Monkeys – you can’t get trendier than that!

Happy Reading,

Dr. Naoisé

Expression Developist